New Jersey State Senator Troy Singleton Recognized in Honor of Black History Month

New Jersey State Senator Troy Singleton Recognized in Honor of Black History Month

troy_s.jpg

 

During this year’s Black History Month, the Northeast Regional Council of Carpenters is highlighting some of the organizations’ notable African American employees who consistently provide leadership, elevate the trade and continue to strengthen workers’ rights.

Troy Singleton, NRCC Director of Operations and Local 255 member works actively throughout the state of New Jersey to elevate the livelihood of working families, minorities and women. Singleton, a newly-elected New Jersey State Senator representing the 7th Legislative District, has served as NRCC’s Director of Operations since 2015. Prior to that, he was the assistant to Executive Secretary-Treasurer from 2013-2015, President of the New Jersey Carpenter Contractor Trust from 2011-2014 and Director of Policy and Planning for the New Jersey Regional Council from 2007-2011.

As an elected official, Singleton was the prime sponsor of the Economic Opportunity Act (A3680), which was signed into law in 2013 and led to major developments, including the construction of the Paulsboro Port and the Subaru Facility in Camden County. He was the prime sponsor of the Higher Education Bond Act (A3139), which was signed into law in 2012, and led to the construction of new school buildings at Montclair University, Rutgers University and Rowan University, among others.

Aside from his duties as an elected official, Singleton is a pillar throughout the state of New Jersey for his work on various community-based projects such as Habitat for Humanity and Serve with Singleton, a volunteer opportunity which joins forces with community members to give back to those in need. As he reflects of the importance of community-togetherness and Black History Month, he notes that it’s a time to celebrate history and culture throughout our nation.

“Black History Month is a time for us to embrace and celebrate the diversity of our great nation”, said Singleton. “It is also a time for us all to reflect on the imperfect legacy of people of color in America, while recommitting ourselves to a more just society that judges us not on our color but on our merit and talents.”